PetArmor Plus Flea & Tick Drops for Dogs Review

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It’s that time of year again; the sun is shining, the snow has finally melted for good, the flowers and trees are blooming.

Cookouts rule the long, warm days and campfires rule the cool nights.

Summer is here.

But with summer comes the bloodsucking and disease bearing pests – fleas, ticks, mosquitos, and the IRS.

And right along with them comes my biannual trip to the pet store for buying flea and tick control.

Like other parents of furbabies, we want the best product available to keep our four-legged kids protected from all the nasty biting things.

But let’s be honest – we all cringe when we drop $300 at the vet’s office or your favorite online or brick and mortar store for a little box containing itty bitty tubes of prevention every 6 months.

I was at my go-to pet store to pick up my usual brand (Advantix®) when the new associate helping me suggested the PetArmor Plus ®.

After a quick sales pitch highlighting the product’s active ingredient as the same as my usual major brand and a much lower price tag, I decided to give it a try on just one of the dogs – you know, what could it hurt? – and also so that there was a good comparison of the two products (you can’t teach an old dog new tricks …).

Besides – who doesn’t want to save a couple hundred bucks a year?

So I grabbed a pack (for use on 45-88 pound dogs), invested part of my savings into a Grande Unicorn Frappe, and headed home with my tiny tubes of liquid gold – and my pride.

Do’s and Don’ts

Like most products along these lines you should NOT use PetArmor Plus on cats.

PetArmor Plus flea treatment reviewIf you have a mixed household, it’s important to keep the freshly treated canines away from the felines for 24-48 hours, allowing the product to fully penetrate and disperse.

PetArmor does offer a feline version of their product, but because of a cat’s system, and their tendency to groom anything they can get their tongues on, this family of products is fatal when absorbed or ingested.

Also, make sure you’re able to apply the product. I know, as silly as that sounds – it’s actually kind of a big thing.

If you’ve got a squirmy little perpetual motion machine that’s running laps around the house in their sleep, make sure you’re able to hold the little escape artist motionless long enough to apply the product.

Otherwise, a pill form might be more appropriate.

Oh, and never use on puppies under 8 weeks and NEVER use on any dog (of any age) that is less than 4 pounds.

Overview

Easy to apply

Snip and squeeze – can flea and tick treatment possibly get any easier than this? The six-pack (6 month of coverage) of tubes easily snap apart.

Then – pointing the top away from your face, just in case – snip the end off. The package insert recommends applying the product all in one spot, between the shoulder blades. There’s no need to comb it through or massage it in.

Easy peasy.

Breaks the flea life cycle

Killing – and repelling – the nasty flea is all well and fine, but what about the eggs? Larva? PetArmor Plus doesn’t offer only one facet of protection.

By targeting and breaking the life cycle of the flea, you’re ensuring the best type of management; prevention and treatment at the same time by 1) driving any live fleas off your dog at the time they hop on, and 2) killing existing fleas, larvae, and eggs.

More than just Lyme disease

Although it’s the most popular concern this time of year, ticks spread more than just the dreaded Lyme disease.

There are six – yes, six – major diseases in addition to Lyme that are spread to canines by ticks that are potentially fatal if left untreated. There are numerous other less-common diseases as well.

If this isn’t motivation enough for you get out and grab some protection, just remember that many tick-borne illnesses are spread to humans, too.

That means when the tick has had his fill of Fluffy and drops off, it’s a gamble if it reattaches to your dog – or YOU.

Convenient dosage schedule

Once a month. That’s it. In less than 60 seconds you can be confident that your precious pooch will remain flea and tick free for 30 days.

No worrying that every time Tank runs through high grass that he’s bringing home Lyme disease to share with your family, or if you have a doggie play date, that they’re bringing home extra little jumping friends to take over your home.

No pre- or post- play treatment required. One tube and they’re done. Repeat in 30 days.

Product Specificationspetarmor plus flea treatment for dogs

  • For use on dogs only
  • Single-tube application
  • Waterproof
  • Controls fleas, ticks, lice, and controls mange infestations
  • Available in 4 packages, based on canine weight;
    • Up to 22 lbs
    • 23 – 44 lbs
    • 45 – 88 lbs
    • 89 – 132 lbs

The Good (Pros)

It sounds silly, but I liked the separate calendar card they enclosed in the box. With multiple dog households like mine, you mark the name of the dog and dates of application and stick it on the fridge.

I know – sometimes it’s the little things that make me happy. Simple things for simple folk I suppose – but whatever works to keep the protection current, especially if for whatever reason they are not on the same application day.

PetArmor Plus application tubes

Snap, snip, and apply

The packaging took convenience to a whole other level. I usually have to use a crowbar and three sticks of dynamite to break into each individually foil-wrapped tube of my regular brand – but not with PetArmor.

Simply snap one tube away from the others. Snip the top off, and away you go.

Application was a breeze, too.

I followed the recommendation my vet made several years ago for applying liquid treatment; rather than squirting the contents into one puddle, I followed her spine from about her mid back up to the center of her shoulders, leaving a few drops every couple of inches.

This allows for easier application on two levels; because your hands parting their hair is masking the feel of the application, as well as helping to avoid skin irritation from a single-zone, concentrated application of the product.

The Bad (Cons)

Simply put, this product didn’t work on my dog.

At all.

A few days after application, I noticed she started to scratch.

On the weekends we take all the kids out to a nature area with a grassy field to romp without leashes, and then down the trail to a wooded area with a stream to play in the water.

Because of the thick canopy of trees, and the water, this area is usually teaming with mosquitos in the middle of the day – and my poor girl was constantly stopping to bite back.

She found some relief splashing in the water with the others – she always enjoys the water! – but heading back into the woods the biting started again.

When I dried her off before getting back into the truck, I saw it.

There was a tick on my baby girl.

The Ugly (Worse Cons)

I pretty much knew we were in trouble when, about an hour after application, I noticed that my girlie had multiple little bald patches everywhere I put the PetArmor Plus.

I don’t mean greasy spots where the hair matted over that looked like bald spots – I mean the hair was gone. >>POOF<< the hair was GONE!

Since the drops were already applied, I decided to run with it. The weekend romp settled it in my mind that the product was not appropriate for our family.

A quick visit with my vet the following week confirmed the reaction and to discontinue use of the product – and a small lecture about switching products without research up front.

Unfortunately, she confirmed that I shouldn’t apply another product until this one had reduced concentration on my dog. Not even powders or sprays could be used because of the amplification of effects and potential toxicity.

As a result we were in for about a month of baths and flea combing after every outing and trip to the park.

Oh yeah, my dog loved that.

Her poor skin was so irritated that by the end of the month we stopped going out of the house for more than a potty run.

30 days later – and an application of my regular product – we were out of quarantine and on the trails.

Buying Advice

Like with any pet medication – you should only purchase this product from a reputable source, such as your veterinary office, your local pet supply shop, or a trusted online retailer. Like everything from purses to little blue ED pills, there are overseas knock-offs flooding the market.

flea and tick drops for dogs

Ever heard of this brand? Me either

And while getting purse-shamed when your Coach bag is called out as fake can be distressing – when it comes to medications (human or animal) it can be a matter of life or death.

The convenience of dosing by weight makes purchasing the product easier – but make sure you have the correct weight of your dog before purchase. The little ball of fur you thought weighed 21 pounds might actually be 25, or your 90 lb Rottie might actually be only 84.

Never mix-n-match tubes, or buy a double size thinking you’re going to use half a tube and get double for your money. It don’t work that way.

Also, it doesn’t hurt to do a little research. There are many reputable products that are generic formulas and work perfectly fine.

But in this day of Google and Amazon, there’s no excuse for not arming yourself with a little information before making a new purchase, or changing brands.

Closing Thoughts

There were several lessons learned in my experience with PetArmor Plus®;

Understand the ingredients.Active ingredients in Pet Armor Plus for dogs

Like with human medication, it’s not just about the primary ingredient. We all know someone who can take the name brand of a medication, but not the generic – or vice-versa.

The ‘inert’ compounds can change the way a product works in a body, which can mean life or death for your pet.

These inert ingredients – while harmless on their own – can change the way a medication acts, reacts, or is absorbed.

Do your research

Know if there’s an open or recently settled class action lawsuit against the product – and why.

CAL’s are started everyday for frivolous reasons. Remember the action against Subway because their ‘footlong’ wasn’t actually 12″? Like I said – frivolous.

But sometimes these lawsuits can be warning flags about something going on with a product that might not make it worth the savings. Knowledge is power.

Every dog is different

I know several people who use this product without any problems. Like any other animal (humans included), sensitivities to ingredients and amounts vary.

If your canine is already on PetArmor Plus® and doing well – and it’s keeping all the nasties away – then that’s great! Keep it up.

It’s not always about the money

I’ve said it for years, about many things, “If it was all about the money, we’d all be driving Yugo’s.” It’s not always just about the price tag.

Yes, in these days where the economy and job market doesn’t know what it’s doing from one minute to the next, it’s hard not to keep a grip on the wallet.

There are areas to cut a bit, and there are areas not to. It’s important that YOU do what is right for YOU and your four legged kids.

After PetArmor Plus application

Bottom line: The PetArmor Plus ® is not the same as K9 Advantix®, and the associate clearly had no real understanding of the product past the superficial sales pitch.

Although PetArmor Plus does boast the same primary ingredient as Frontline™ (Fipronil), it is not the same chemical compound or end product – as we’ve seen, the ancillary ingredients can make a huge difference in the absorption or action of the medication.

That being said, if your dog is on PetArmor Plus ® and doing well – especially if he has been on it for some time – then there is really no reason to make any change based on this review, or the 2012 class action lawsuit.

Remember: Every dog is different.

In my personal experience, K9 Advantix II (check out my review) keeps away the fleas, ticks, biting flies, and mosquitos without any side effects on any of my dogs.

And my dogs agree.

The post PetArmor Plus Flea & Tick Drops for Dogs Review appeared first on Central Park Paws.

from http://www.centralparkpaws.net/flea-medication/petarmor-plus-flea-tick-drops-dogs-review/

Dog Breeds That Don’t Shed: Is There Such a Thing as a Hypoallergenic Dog?

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They say that relationships are like the old Kenny Roger’s song The Gambler: You gotta know when to hold ‘em, know when to fold ‘em, know when to walk away – and know when to run.

Such a sentiment would have been laughed at until a couple years ago when I met Hubby … because our happily-ever-after, almost wasn’t.

I think it was sometime just after our engagement that the shoe dropped.

He was allergic to dogs.

I had moved to town a few years earlier, and was looking forward to ditching the apartment in favor of a house with a yard and a dog or two (or ten…).

How could this happen? I was a life-long dog lover – and the love of my life was allergic to them?

What’s a girl to do?

So we took to Google – and his doctor – in search of a compromise.

What Causes Pet Allergies?

The most interesting fact we uncovered is that about 10% of the population is allergic to dogs and cats. That’s a lot of Zyrtec™! The real surprise, though, was that the allergy was primarily to the pet dander, not the animal itself.

So we set out to identify what pet dander actually was – and what we could do about it.

Boy, was that enlightening.

What is Pet Dander?

Basically, pet dander is teeny tiny flakes of dried skin from fur or feathered animals. It’s microscopic and very lightweight, allowing it to go anywhere and is very difficult to clean with the average monthly dusting of the furniture.

So if you’re allergic to dogs, you’re allergic to birds, cats, mice, guinea pigs, and any other little critter that has fur or feathers.

The Other Cause of Pet Allergies

The other half of the allergy is an enzyme. It can be found in your pet’s saliva and urine. This enzyme – added to the dander – kicks up the allergy a notch. The instances of sensitivity to the enzyme alone is very small, but to both is more common.

How to Live with Pet Allergies

There are several ways to reduce the dander of your existing pets and environment, which may go a long way to controlling the allergy and making cohabitation tolerable:

  •  Consider a whole house air purifier, such as Breathe Fresh’s 5-in-1 (my mother has two and swears by them). A high-end air cleaner will remove irritants and allergens – like pet dander from – while circulating the air.
  •  Increase routine home maintenance such as dusting, and vacuuming all soft surfaces weekly.
  •  Shampoo the carpets more frequently (especially if you have fleas).
  •  Bathe and groom your pooch once a week.
  •  Avoid letting your dog lick you.
  •  Consider a hypoallergenic pet.
    hypoallergenic dogs dont exist

    credit: AAFA

Armed with this information, we were able to make choices that were best for us – which was starting with a “hypoallergenic” dog.

Sniff This: There’s no such thing as a hypoallergenic dog.

The canines that are classified as “hypoallergenic” have hair rather than fur – which lends themselves to eliminating a large slice of the allergy (the dander). They also tend to have a non-shedding coat, which again will eliminate the exposure to the allergen.

The flip side to this is that these dogs need actual maintenance. Not just an occasional bath or trip to the groomers – actual washing and clipping and trimming.

And just like ladies and little girls (and some guys) the longer the hair, the more maintenance is required.

But don’t think that a hairless dog will get you out of any extra work. Bald skin needs lovin’, too.

If you – like me – find that you can’t live without a four-legged bundle of energy, we’ve helped out with a list of the most common breeds that will help control the allergies.

“Hypoallergenic” Dog Breeds that Don’t Shed

Afghan Hound

Hypoallergenic Dogs - Afghan HoundProbably the most aristocratic of any canine breeds is the Afghan Hound. This tall canine is easily one of the most striking, and beautiful dogs to watch in action with their long hair flowing in the breeze.

It’s easy to see why they were bred and kept by royalty, and are the preferred pet of upscale ladies.

  •  Typical size: Large.
  •  Typical weight: 60lbs.
  •  Temperament: The Afghan Hound is a beautiful dog – and knows it. Yet for their aloofness, they are a loyal breed with a sweet disposition.
  •  Color: Most commonly seen in golds or tans, this breed actually has a wide range of coloring and marking.
  •  Coat: Very long and flowing.

Thoughts: The most common name for this breed is “Rapunzel” – and for good reason. The extra-long hair requires dedication to maintain, especially since tangling and matting can occur quickly.

American Hairless Terrier

American Hairless TerrierThis hairless breed is just that – hairless. As bald as Uncle Jimmy. The puppies have a fuzzy coat that is usually gone by about 10 weeks.

The adult may have very fine, short hair. It’s this hairlessness that lends themselves to be considered an appropriate choice for those with allergies.

  •  Typical size: Medium.
  •  Typical weight: 25 lbs.
  •  Temperament: These originated from a breed of working dogs, and have retained their active disposition.
  •  Color: Varying shades and markings.
  •  Coat: Hairless, although they may retain a coat of very short, very fine hair.

Thoughts: An active breed that loves adventure, these curious and fearless dogs are a good match for children, and do best with ample space to run.

Bichon Frise

Bichon Frise Non Shedding DogThis adorable white puffball is one of the favorites of allergy suffers and the elderly. Although one of the smaller breeds, the Bichon Frise is a sweet and playful bundle of energy that is full of love and snuggles.

  •  Typical size: Small.
  •  Typical weight: 20lbs.
  •  Temperament: A friendly breed, very affectionate.
  •  Color: Predominantly white, although they may slightly beige.
  •  Coat: Long hair that can be clipped and primped.

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Thoughts: Their sweet disposition and energetic personality make this breed an excellent choice for a child’s pet. The adult is less playful and tend to be excellent elder companion dogs, and do well in an apartment setting.

Labradoodle

Labradoodle Assistance_DogsAlthough not always officially recognized as a breed of its own, the Labradoodle is exactly what you’d imagine – 50% labrador and 50% poodle.

This cross-breed originated in Australia, and has taken the world by storm by taking the best of both dogs; the temperament of a lab and the shedless-ness of a poodle.

  •  Typical size: Medium to large.
  •  Typical weight: 25 – 80 lbs.
  •  Temperament: Feisty, family dogs with an affinity for waterplay.
  •  Color: Color varies from white to black, usually solid.
  •  Coat: Medium length hair, can be fairly straight to downright curly.

Thoughts: The wide range in size is due to the parentage – whether bred with a standard or miniature poodle. This highly intelligent breed is an excellent family dog, and requires space to romp on a daily basis.

Maltese

Maltese short hair

Maltese long hair

Maltese with long hair

Another of aristocratic origin, this small breed is known for its long, white hair – and it’s boundless energy. Groomed either naturally long hair, or a shorter trim, it’s not at all unusual to see these small dogs with ribbons and bows, and prancing about like a little princess.

  •  Typical size: Small.
  •  Typical weight: 8-14 lbs.
  •  Temperament: Seeks human companionship. Playful but gentle.
  •  Color: White.
  •  Coat: Long, silky hair.

Thoughts: Because of their unusual disposition to allowing primping with ribbons, bows, and other hair accessories, and gently playful demeanor, the Maltese tend to do well with elderly and little girls.

Miniature Schnauzer

Miniature Schnauzer doesn't shedUnlike other miniature versions of larger breeds, the Miniature Schnauzer looks like a standard schnauzer was hit with a shrink ray. The temperament is similar, and the body proportions are similar – just smaller.

  •  Typical size: Small.
  •  Typical weight: 12-18 lbs.
  •  Temperament: Friendly and very obedient.
  •  Color: Two-tone; black and white, black and silver.
  •  Coat: Coarse, wiry hair.

Thoughts: Like other schnauzers, the Miniature Schnauzer has a pleasant temperament, is quick to learn and eager to please, making crate training a breeze. The coat is often rough and bristly.

Poodle

standard poodle has hair not furThe Poodle is a truly versatile breed, and like automobiles are available from toy up to full size. These highly intelligent animals make excellent family dogs, being versatile and adaptable to their environment.

  •  Typical size: Toy to large.
  •  Typical weight: 5-60 lbs.
  •  Temperament: Affectionate, family oriented.
  •  Color: Varies, but generally solid.
  •  Coat: Curly and coarse.

Thoughts: The Poodle is the most common canine when considering a hypoallergenic dog. These dogs are highly intelligent and friendly. No matter the size, the poodle appears – according to some – to gain an air of dignity when clipped or shaved.

Portuguese Water Dog

Portuguese Water DogA lesser known breed that is becoming popular among allergy suffers, especially men, because of their athleticism and adventurous spirit – as well as their cool name.

These are truly a working dog, originating in Portugal they retrieved nets, herded schools of fish, and were even trained to carry messages from the sea to land and back again. Their most unique characteristic is their webbed feet.

  •  Typical size: Medium to large.
  •  Typical weight: 35-50 lbs.
  •  Temperament: Affectionate and kid friendly.
  •  Color: Black, brown, or two-tone.
  •  Coat: Wavy or tightly curled.

Thoughts: This highly intelligent canine does best with a yard and activity, and are becoming a newer favorite of duck hunters.

Standard Schnauzer

Standard Schnauzer

Commonly referred to as “old man dog”, the Schnauzer is easily identifiable by the long eyebrows and moustache – but unlike their nickname these dogs are anything but feeble.

Highly energetic and intelligent, this breed can play from sunup to sunset, but also has excellent self-control for when romping is deemed inappropriate.

  •  Typical size: Medium.
  •  Typical weight: 30-40 lbs.
  •  Temperament: Protective and family centered.
  •  Color: Black, grey, two-tone
  •  Coat: Thick and wiry,

Thoughts: The Schnauzer is an intelligent animal that is quick to learn and please. Mastering the basic commands should be a breeze to them.

They do best with consistent human interaction and are excellent family dogs.

Less Popular Breeds to Consider

This is not an exhaustive list of breeds that are referred to as “hypoallergenic” (no canine is truly hypoallergenic!). We wanted to highlight the common breeds available nationwide. Some of the lesser-common breeds could include:

Sniff This: If you’re thinking of pulling a fast one by saying you’re allergic to dogs because you want to get a cat – be sure your obfuscation will find you out!

Which Non-Shedding Breed is the Best?

Because bringing a new furbaby into your home is a lifelong commitment, rather than a recommendation of one breed over another, here are a few final thoughts …

  1. With a solid commitment to grooming schedule with daily brushing, and a once-a-day allergy pill, many people who are hypersensitive to dog dander find they can coexist with just about any breed without any undue suffering. Check with your doctor.
  2. Before bringing a dog – or cat, for that matter – home, make sure to let your kids spend some time around them to ascertain if there are any allergies. Bringing a new member into the family only to have to give it up isn’t fair to anyone, and can be avoided with a little planning and some clever recon.
  3. When choosing a dog, the choice needs to be mutual. Spend time with the litter and take home the puppy who doesn’t want to leave you. In that fuzzy little jellybean you will find your lifelong companion.

As far as my lifelong companion, we now have several dogs – most of which do not fall into the “hypoallergenic” category – with the aid of a consistent grooming and housekeeping schedule.

The post Dog Breeds That Don’t Shed: Is There Such a Thing as a Hypoallergenic Dog? appeared first on Central Park Paws.

from http://www.centralparkpaws.net/pet-facts/dog-breeds-that-dont-shed/

The difference between dogs and cats

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You’ve probably seen several cartoons in which a dog lies down on a psychiatrist’s couch and utters, via word balloon, something wise, incisive or pithy. But the truth of the matter is dogs (though some have issues and baggage) don’t need psychiatrists all that much — not nearly as much as we suspect cats might. […]
Via http://www.ohmidog.com/2017/03/23/the-difference-between-dogs-and-cats/

Boy with Vitiligo meets the dog that has inspired him from afar — Rowdy the Lab

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An 8-year-old Arkansas boy got to meet the dog who has inspired him from afar for the past year. Thanks to an anonymous donor, Carter Blanchard, who has Vitiligo, an auto-immune disease that causes skin to lose its pigmentation, flew to Oregon over the weekend to meet Rowdy, a 14-year-old black lab with the same […]
Via http://www.ohmidog.com/2017/03/22/boy-with-vitiligo-meets-the-dog-that-has-inspired-him-from-afar-rowdy-the-lab/

Abused dog finds three-year-old girl neglected and naked in woods of Michigan

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An abused dog who ended up in a shelter and was adopted last year led her new owner to a three-year-old girl found naked and shivering in the woods behind their home. Peanut’s owners said the dog “started going crazy” while inside the house, barking and running up and down the stairs. When they let […]
Via http://www.ohmidog.com/2017/03/21/abused-dog-finds-three-year-old-girl-neglected-and-naked-in-woods-of-michigan/

Blue Buffalo recalls another dog food

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Blue Buffalo has issued another dog food recall — the third in the last two months. The company says its Blue Wilderness Rocky Mountain Recipe Red Meat Dinner Wet Food for Adult Dogs has the potential to contain elevated levels of naturally-occurring beef thyroid hormones. The voluntary recall applies to one production lot (840243101153). The […]
Via http://www.ohmidog.com/2017/03/21/blue-buffalo-recalls-another-dog-food/

Government cyanide bomb kills family dog

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It looks like a harmless sprinkler head, but it’s a bomb, filled with poison — and your own federal government planted it. They are called predator control devices, or M-44s, and they are placed — generally in remote areas in the West — by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to control fox and coyote populations. […]
Via http://www.ohmidog.com/2017/03/20/government-cyanide-bomb-kills-family-dog/